September 12, 2013
Otolith Group, I See Infinite Distance Between Any Place and Another, 2012 — installation view from Words and Places: Etel Adnan, CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco, Summer 2013
A review of the exhibition in Art in America.

Otolith Group, I See Infinite Distance Between Any Place and Another, 2012 — installation view from Words and Places: Etel Adnan, CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco, Summer 2013

A review of the exhibition in Art in America.

May 27, 2013
"they tell me there are four seasons
but i live in a fifth one
which is your space
and your time"

— Etel Adnan, Five Senses for One Death, The Smith, 1971

May 15, 2013
Words and Places: Etel Adnan, Wattis Institute, San Francisco, 2013 [With Chris Marker, Junkopia, 1981 and several paintings and leporellos by Adnan]
Tara McDowell writes about the exhibition for Artforum here.

Words and Places: Etel Adnan, Wattis Institute, San Francisco, 2013 [With Chris Marker, Junkopia, 1981 and several paintings and leporellos by Adnan]

Tara McDowell writes about the exhibition for Artforum here.

May 8, 2013
Chris Marker, Sans Soleil, still, 1983. Screening May 15 at the Wattis Institute, San Francisco, in conjunction with our students’ exhibition Words and Places: Etel Adnan.

Chris Marker, Sans Soleil, still, 1983. Screening May 15 at the Wattis Institute, San Francisco, in conjunction with our students’ exhibition Words and Places: Etel Adnan.

April 27, 2013

supersuperette:

1 list of Works in the Etel Adnan Exhibition : my favorite being 2 Funeral March for the First Cosmonaut, or Five Senses for One Death : (water-color, accordion binded poems with unreadable markings) : 3-4 from Funeral March.. : 5 from Five Senses for One Death

April 22, 2013
Simone Fattal’s film Autoportrait, 1971/2012, screens this Thursday, April 25 at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco, in conjunction with Words and Places: Etel Adnan. Read Kaelen Wilson-Goldie’s take on the film for Artforum here, and see a preview here. 

Simone Fattal’s film Autoportrait, 1971/2012, screens this Thursday, April 25 at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco, in conjunction with Words and Places: Etel AdnanRead Kaelen Wilson-Goldie’s take on the film for Artforum here, and see a preview here

April 18, 2013

supersuperette:

last night at Etel Adnan’s opening exhibition Words and Places curated by several CCA students : recorded audio of a collective reading of a poem from The Arab Apocalypse by Etel with Norma Cole leading on the mic : Norma suggested a group reading to her students, which opened up an event that - in several ways - “decentered” the reading : i.e. decentered Norma’s position as a reader, the audience as audience and the individuals who attempted to involve themselves as individual readers : in the audio you can hear so much fragmentation of this process of decentralization : some voices reaching above or below, or in front of or behind others : at other times a centrality of harmony is plateaued and then decomposes back into a type of imminent failure

Incredible moment — and how great that there is a record of it. 

April 17, 2013
lormiguel:

Etel Adnan, Al-Halllaj, Qasaid, 2008. Watercolour and ink on Japanese book, 27 x 630 cm. © Etel Adnan. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.
Dedicated to  grupa o.k.

"During this time Adnan discovered the format of the leporello, an accordion-folded book, where her painting and poetry found a compelling hybrid form. In one of the earliest of these leporellos, Adnan copied poems written in Arabic, a language that she spoke, but had never learned to read or write (having grown up in Lebanon under French colonial influence). As she transcribed the Arabic characters, without quite knowing what she was writing, she felt as if she were drawing the poems, and that they could then be understood as images in their own right. Otherwise tied to the word, and therefore to a world of signified meaning, for Adnan this handwritten language began to verge instead on drawn abstraction.” 
— Antonia Marsh, in the gallery guide and publication for Words and Places: Etel Adnan, opening tonight, April 17, 2013.

lormiguel:

Etel Adnan, Al-Halllaj, Qasaid, 2008. Watercolour and ink on Japanese book, 27 x 630 cm. © Etel Adnan. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

Dedicated to  grupa o.k.

"During this time Adnan discovered the format of the leporello, an accordion-folded book, where her painting and poetry found a compelling hybrid form. In one of the earliest of these leporellos, Adnan copied poems written in Arabic, a language that she spoke, but had never learned to read or write (having grown up in Lebanon under French colonial influence). As she transcribed the Arabic characters, without quite knowing what she was writing, she felt as if she were drawing the poems, and that they could then be understood as images in their own right. Otherwise tied to the word, and therefore to a world of signified meaning, for Adnan this handwritten language began to verge instead on drawn abstraction.”

— Antonia Marsh, in the gallery guide and publication for Words and Places: Etel Adnan, opening tonight, April 17, 2013.

April 16, 2013
Programming that accompanies the exhibition Words and Places: Etel Adnan, which opens at the Wattis Institute April 17, 2013.

Programming that accompanies the exhibition Words and Places: Etel Adnan, which opens at the Wattis Institute April 17, 2013.

April 15, 2013
Etel Adnan, Funeral March for the First Cosmonaut, 1968 — detail of leporello with ink and watercolor. Words and Places: Etel Adnan opens Wednesday, April 17, 2013, at the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco. More information here.

Etel Adnan, Funeral March for the First Cosmonaut, 1968 — detail of leporello with ink and watercolor. Words and Places: Etel Adnan opens Wednesday, April 17, 2013, at the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco. More information here.

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