April 17, 2014
Susanne Kriemann, Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory (Graves), 2010

Susanne Kriemann, Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory (Graves), 2010

April 16, 2014
Marcel Broodthaers, Untitled (Les Portes du Musée) [The Doors of the Museum], 1968–1969

Marcel Broodthaers, Untitled (Les Portes du Musée) [The Doors of the Museum], 1968–1969

(Source: blog.cmoa.org)

April 15, 2014
Ian Wallace, In The Studio (Le Livre), 1993/2005 [Many Places at Once]

Ian Wallace, In The Studio (Le Livre), 1993/2005 [Many Places at Once]

April 15, 2014
Ian Wallace, At Work 1983, Or Gallery, Vancouver [Many Places at Once]

Ian Wallace, At Work 1983, Or Gallery, Vancouver [Many Places at Once]

April 4, 2014
Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled, 1991, located at 24 21st St., Long Island City, New York — installed by the Museum of Modern Art at 24 sites throughout NY area.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled, 1991, located at 24 21st St., Long Island City, New York — installed by the Museum of Modern Art at 24 sites throughout NY area.

April 3, 2014
Vadim Zakharov, Little Elephants, 1982

Vadim Zakharov, Little Elephants, 1982

April 3, 2014
Allan deSouza, Ark of Martyrs (video still), 2014 (in process)
Ark of Martyrs presents the first five pages of deSouza’s rewriting of Joseph Conrad’s 1899 novel Heart of Darkness. Whereas Conrad’s original text is framed as the narration of Charles Marlow, a British sailor who transports ivory along the Congo River during the height of European imperialism, Ark of Martyrs is set at a contemporary wedding party. DeSouza’s rewriting mirrors Conrad’s syntax, and employs rhyme and alliteration: “The water shone pacifically” becomes “The daughter yawned terrifically.” The text making up Ark of Martyrs scrolls over the screen while a narrator (Stephen Wattrus) reads the corresponding passages from Heart of Darkness. According to deSouza, Conrad contrasts the present day “civility” of the River Thames, from where the story is told, with the timeless “savagery” of the Congo River, where Marlow’s story is set.
Download the gallery guide, with Joanna’s short essay on the work [PDF].

Allan deSouza, Ark of Martyrs (video still), 2014 (in process)

Ark of Martyrs presents the first five pages of deSouza’s rewriting of Joseph Conrad’s 1899 novel Heart of Darkness. Whereas Conrad’s original text is framed as the narration of Charles Marlow, a British sailor who transports ivory along the Congo River during the height of European imperialism, Ark of Martyrs is set at a contemporary wedding party. DeSouza’s rewriting mirrors Conrad’s syntax, and employs rhyme and alliteration: “The water shone pacifically” becomes “The daughter yawned terrifically.” The text making up Ark of Martyrs scrolls over the screen while a narrator (Stephen Wattrus) reads the corresponding passages from Heart of Darkness. According to deSouza, Conrad contrasts the present day “civility” of the River Thames, from where the story is told, with the timeless “savagery” of the Congo River, where Marlow’s story is set.

Download the gallery guide, with Joanna’s short essay on the work [PDF].

April 3, 2014
Adrian Piper, I am the locus #5, 1975

Adrian Piper, I am the locus #5, 1975

April 3, 2014
Adrian Piper, I am the locus #4, 1975

Adrian Piper, I am the locus #4, 1975

April 3, 2014
Adrian Piper, I am the locus #3, 1975

Adrian Piper, I am the locus #3, 1975

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