July 9, 2012
Joseph Beuys and Douglas Davis at documenta 6, 1977. As published in From Europe: Art Contemporary 9. Vol. 3 No. 1, 1977.
Clicking the photograph links through to Julian’s short essay for Mousse's special issue on documenta, titled “Documenta, Stationary.” The editors’ challenge was to consider the history of documenta in general, which the essay does, more or less. Certain among its writerly peculiarities, however, will need to be attributed to the quirks of Mousse's editorial process — starting with the title, which they've rendered as “Documenta Stationery.” I intended the title as a play on the title of Louise Lawler’s artwork Documenta Stationery (1982), in order to suggest that this exhibition, a so-called “archive in motion,” needed to be stilled, stopped, in order to be considered. But the distinction between “writing material” and “motionlessness” has been elided and the reference to Lawler’s work made regrettably literal. (Other such slippages dot the writing beyond.)
Still, I hope the essay retains some value, even if it requires that the reader “squint” to see the argument’s original form behind its somewhat inexact image.

Joseph Beuys and Douglas Davis at documenta 6, 1977. As published in From Europe: Art Contemporary 9. Vol. 3 No. 1, 1977.

Clicking the photograph links through to Julian’s short essay for Mousse's special issue on documenta, titled “Documenta, Stationary.” The editors’ challenge was to consider the history of documenta in general, which the essay does, more or less. Certain among its writerly peculiarities, however, will need to be attributed to the quirks of Mousse's editorial process — starting with the title, which they've rendered as “Documenta Stationery.” I intended the title as a play on the title of Louise Lawler’s artwork Documenta Stationery (1982), in order to suggest that this exhibition, a so-called “archive in motion,” needed to be stilled, stopped, in order to be considered. But the distinction between “writing material” and “motionlessness” has been elided and the reference to Lawler’s work made regrettably literal. (Other such slippages dot the writing beyond.)

Still, I hope the essay retains some value, even if it requires that the reader “squint” to see the argument’s original form behind its somewhat inexact image.

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  15. grupaok reblogged this from grupaok and added:
    Reposting: NY Times reports that the artist Douglas Davis died on Jan. 16. He was 80 years old. We discovered his work...